Scientific FantasyWhat if Earth the Centre of the Solar System?...

What if Earth the Centre of the Solar System? An Exploration of the Hypothetical

-

- Advertisment -spot_img

The Sun has a powerful gravitational pull on all objects in the universe. Because Earth is so small, it doesn’t have much gravitational pull. If Earth were the centre of the solar system, it would mean that all of the Sun’s energy comes from one place. 

But suppose Earth were the centre of the solar system, meaning that its position at any given moment causes a round trip to take place around the Sun. In that case, this means that everything on Earth revolves around Earth twice daily — once in the morning and once in the evening. That’s a lot like being at the centre of the world!

What Is the Weather Like in the Center of the Solar System?

The weather in the centre of the solar system is scorching and dry. It is primarily based on the amount of solar energy reaching the Earth’s surface. The weather is very unpredictable, however, as there are no stars to illuminate the skies or block out the Sun’s light.

The entire solar system can be covered in caked sand, for example. If we were to look at the entire solar system from the exact location, we would see that most of it are almost entirely covered in this desert-like material. The only bright place in all of this is the brightest star in the night sky, the Sun. However, even this is almost entirely hidden by the endless expanse of the Earth’s surface.

Photo By :
John Fowler / Unsplash

What Would Be Left if Earth Were the Center of the Solar System?

It is the most obvious thing to say about this because it is the one thing that anyone who is even slightly interested in human-made environment and energy technology can assume about the centre of the solar system. 

Could We Ever Revisit Earth?

The only planet in the solar system that we are aware of is the Earth. To visit the Earth, we would first have to head to the location in the solar system where the Earth is at the moment. We would have to head to the centre of the solar system to revisit Earth.

If we were to head to the Sun, we would end up there in the same year as the one where the Earth is at the centre of the solar system. Thus, we would have the opportunity to visit the Earth in its current state, almost completely covered in sand. However, it is also possible to imagine a future Earth where the sand is being pulled away from the ground by the developing sea levels.

Could We Ever Visit Jupiter?

To visit Jupiter, we would have to travel over 1.5 billion kilometres (1 billion miles) away from our Sun. To put that distance into perspective, that is more than 5 times farther away from the Sun than Pluto; it would take us more than 20 years to get there. It would also be a very long trip because it would take us more than 12 years to reach Jupiter!

Photo By :
Max McKinnon / Unsplash

Surrounded by Ring of Fire

If the Earth were the centre of the solar system, it would be surrounded by a ring of fire. The Sun is a ball of fire with a temperature of approximately 5,500 degrees F. That means if we took all of the sunlight that hits the Earth and spread it out evenly across the surface of our planet, then every inch of the surface would receive 17.5 inches of sunlight per hour.

In other words, if Earth were at the centre of our solar system, it would be surrounded by a ring-shaped mass of 17 1/2 feet deep and 93 million miles in diameter — roughly 1/3 mile deep and twice around Earth’s circumference!

Earth would have to be spinning fast to make this work — much faster than any other planet in our solar system now! Scientists estimate that if Earth were at the centre of our entire solar system, it would have to spin as fast as 250 miles per hour!

Darkness All the Time

If Earth were at the centre of our solar system, then the entire Milky Way would be visible from the surface of Earth. As a result, there would be no night and day, and we would have to live in perpetual darkness.

It is also doubtful that a planet could ever exist at the centre of our solar system. The gravitational force between the Sun and planets is so great that any planet formed there would be quickly drawn out into a long elliptical orbit.

According to one theory, Jupiter can form such an orbit today, but this has not happened since Jupiter’s formation 4.5 billion years ago. So if Earth were at the centre of our solar system, it seems likely that it would have long ago pulled out all other planets into elongated orbits like Jupiter’s (and probably Mercury’s too).

If this were true, most planetary scientists agree that we should not expect to find any other planets in our solar system today! It means that if Earth were at the centre of our solar system, astronomers would expect to see no more than four or five other planets orbiting the Sun within 100 AU (less than 1/3 of an astronomical unit) — none more than Neptune nor any outside its orbit! 

If we are right about where our Sun is in its travels through space — and if we assume that all stars are very similar in size — then there should be no more than 10-15 planets orbiting other stars within 100 AU. It is far less than the number we find today!

But if our solar system is not at the centre of our galaxy, then most astronomers are convinced that other solar systems have been formed around other stars. It means that we should expect to see many more planets orbiting other stars — at least tens of thousands!

What Would Be the Temperature of Space?

If we were the centre of the solar system, space would be about seven times colder than it is currently because all the matter in the solar system is being held together by some energy. This “matter” could be air, space rock, or some icy material. If the Earth were the centre of the solar system, it would be about seven degrees colder than it is today.

What Would Be the Gravity of Space?

If the Earth were at the centre of our galaxy, its gravity would be about 7 times what we have on Earth today. The gravity on Earth’s moon (which has a radius similar to that of our planet) would be about 9 times that we have on Earth today. It is what we see.

The gravity on the planet:

  • Mercury: twice that which we have on Earth
  • Mars: 4 times that which we have on Earth
  • Jupiter: 1.5 times that which we have on Earth
  • Saturn: 0.4 times that which we have on Earth
  • Uranus: 0.2 times that which we have on Earth
  • Neptune: 0.15 times that which we have on Earth
  • Pluto: 0.06 times that which we have on Earth today.
Photo By :
Jeremy Thomas / Unsplash

Would the Human Life Survive if Earth?

If Earth were the centre of the solar system, it would be colder than anything we know on Earth today. It would mean that the human body could not survive for very long. The human body is designed to be warm and must be kept at a temperature of about 37 degrees Celsius to keep us alive. If there were no atmosphere or other life-sustaining energy on Mars, then there would be no way for us to survive for very long.

Other Hypothetical Consequences

1. The Sun would be about 1,200 times dimmer than it is today.

2. The Earth’s orbit would be about 1,100 times more eccentric than it is today.

3. The Earth would have been significantly closer to the Sun in the past than it is now (about 4 billion years ago).

4. The Moon would have been more significant and closer to the Earth (about 8% as far from Earth as it is now).

5. The planet Venus would have been much closer to the Sun in the past (about 0.3 AU or 3 times as far from the Sun as it is now).

6. Mercury, Venus, and Mars would not have formed in their present orbits; they would have formed in much larger orbits around the Sun that are much farther out from the Sun than they are today (about 0.5-1 AU).

7. Saturn and Jupiter may not have formed at all; there may never have been a solar system!

8. Jupiter may not have formed in its present orbit (within 1 AU of the Sun) but in a much larger orbit that would have been about 20 times farther from the Sun than it is today.

9. The Earth’s orbit may have been much more extensive (about 2 AU), and the Earth may have formed a much larger orbit around the Sun (about 10 AU).

10. The distance from the Sun to the nearest star may have been about 100 times larger than it is now (about 1 light year).

11. All planets would be considerably more massive than they are today.

12. Some of them might be more than twice as massive as Jupiter is today, and others might be more than three times as massive as Jupiter.

13. There would probably not have been any large moons around any of the planets, but there would likely have been large satellites closer to the planet which orbited much farther from the planet than they do now (like Saturn’s moon Titan).

14. There would likely have been no continents on any of the planets, but there would likely have been vast oceans and lakes on each planet.

15. There would have been no atmosphere or water vapour on any of the planets.

16. The Sun would be much closer to the Earth than it is today (about 1/25th of its current distance).

17. The planets would not be tidally locked to the Sun, and their days and nights might not be exactly 24 hours long.

18. The planets would not have moons.

19. The planets would not have rings, and the rings would be much smaller than they are today.

20. Some planets might have been closer to their stars than others, and their orbits would have been much looser than they are now.

Photo By :
Mathew Schwartz / Unsplash

Conclusion

The Earth is the most populous planet in the universe. It orbits the Sun once every two and a half months, and it is only a tiny part of the Solar System that is visible to the naked eye. A thin shell of solid rock surrounds the Earth called the atmosphere. It protects the Earth from the Sun’s powerful magnetic field, which is responsible for keeping the Earth from rotating too quickly.

Although the Earth is not the centre of the solar system, it is the most visible body in the solar system. When the Earth is at its centre, it is rotating around the Sun in the opposite direction to the direction that the Sun is rotating. Thus, the Earth’s surface is almost entirely covered with wind, sand, and water.

 

If you liked this article, check out: ‘What If 1 Dollar = Rs 1 Happened? The Real World Implications of This Economic Reality.’

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest news

It’s 2072: Future of the Atmosphere Explored! How is it Affecting the World?

Earth's atmosphere comprises 78% gas, 21% oxygen, and a simple fraction of alternative gases. These gases are layers of...

Is It Possible To Live Without Money? Let’s Explore the Unique Prospect

Is there a way to live without money? We have all seen the movie "The Matrix," where people live...

Dualism Unlocked: The Fascinating Implications of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, authored by Robert Louis Stevenson, is one of the most talked...

What If Books Didn’t Exist

What If Books Didn't Exist? A world without books will be a world where psychological growth will become stagnant...
- Advertisement -spot_imgspot_img

All of Us Are Dead: Intriguing K-Drama or A Scary Future Reality?

All of us are Dead is the hit 2022 K-drama that landed on Netflix in January. Everyone wishes for...

How Will Advanced Biotechnology Transform The World?

Biotechnology has been delivering cutting-edge innovations to humanity year after year. How advanced biotechnology may fare over several years...

Must read

It’s 2072: Future of the Atmosphere Explored! How is it Affecting the World?

Earth's atmosphere comprises 78% gas, 21% oxygen, and a...

Is It Possible To Live Without Money? Let’s Explore the Unique Prospect

Is there a way to live without money? We...
- Advertisement -spot_imgspot_img

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you